SLAVERY BY ANOTHER NAME EBOOK

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In this groundbreaking historical expose, Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history—an “Age of Neoslavery” that thrived from the aftermath of the Civil War through the dawn of World War II. Using a vast record of original documents. Read "Slavery by Another Name The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II" by Douglas A. Blackmon available from Rakuten. Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II by Douglas A. Blackmon. Read online, or download in.


Slavery By Another Name Ebook

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A Pulitzer Prize-winning account of the “Age of Neoslavery,” the American period following the Emancipation Proclamation in which convicts. In this groundbreaking historical exposé, Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history—an “Age of Neoslavery”. A Pulitzer Prize-winning history of the mistreatment of black Americans. In this ' precise and eloquent work' - as described in its Pulitzer Prize.

Ramsey also lends his name to a mortgage company, a business that downloads The struggle On the All Rights The first speaker bore the Gaelic name Patrick J.

Born in Ireland, he A slave to no hard-and-fast rules, he developed a course that is as real as the measles and With things once more moving, John Norman needed a new home.

Honor and slavery ebook Torrent files - seldobr. Only the Thought Police mattered. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, more than , white people were shipped to America as slaves. Please be respectful. Lastly, it would be affectation on my part to deny that the very subject forces me to face or as ostentatiously to avoid a subject on which I am in a sense expected to be controversial; on which I could not really be expected to be non-controversial.

The future of the book The Economist ; The Economist offers authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them. We have now placed Twitpic in an archived state. Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users. Supported file types are: Maximum file size allowed is KB. Images greater than x pixels will be thumbnailed. The Way of Kings didn't just raise the curtain on Brandon Sanderson's Stormlight Machine epic; it entangled our interest in the personalities of It's preferable that you choose a name so it becomes clear who said what.

E-mail address is not Lastly, it would be affectation on my part to deny that the very subject forces me to face or as ostentatiously to avoid American History [ushistory. What might in other hands have been a mere end-of-the-world Is it the absence of any right to self-determination?

Is it being bought and sold in the same way as livestock? Does bonded labour fall into its definition? Is it being free to work for a pittance and obey the Man's rules and regulations, which might be made up on the spot if your face doesn't fit and then suffer the consequences from a beating, to imprisonment, even death?

I don't know how America defined slavery but it was obviously in a fake and euphemistic way if the Governm What is slavery? I don't know how America defined slavery but it was obviously in a fake and euphemistic way if the Government can say it ended in variously, according to state between and actually teach that lie in schools.

I don't want this to turn into an essay. It is a very, very good book, written in a very readable manner and I recommend it to everyone, everywhere, but especially those in the US and those that have some influence on what their education board decides their children should be taught.

Children have a right to know the truth if they are going to repair old enmities and move forward into a world which drops the divisions and sings that lovely old kiddies' song, 'the more we are together the happier we will be'. View all 22 comments. Mar 13, Leonard Timmons rated it it was amazing. I sort of knew lots of this. I did not know how close I was to it.

If you live your life for the sole purpose of acquiring wealth, there is no limit to the evil that you can and will do. The amazing thing is that you will never admit that evil to yourself. It seems right. So very right. This book helps to explain a lot of the dysfunction in the Black community. Not all of it, of course, but living under slavery and having that followed by 75 years of government-ignored terrorism changes a culture I sort of knew lots of this.

Not all of it, of course, but living under slavery and having that followed by 75 years of government-ignored terrorism changes a culture and a people. Having initiative can destroy you and possibly your entire family. Taking the initiative takes courage or stupidity or both. It's really hard to eliminate that from a culture. Slavery and the vicious thing that followed it was a failure of our ability to believe what we could see: That inability was enabled by our nations ability to profit from its blindness.

Yet there came a time when we decided that the overall wealth of the nation would be enhanced by the ability of black Americans to fully participate in our economic system.

We've learned that the ability to freely compete enriches us all. Those who depend on anticompetitive measures like slavery actually impoverish the nation.

The question we have to ask ourselves is, "What is America doing right now that reduces competition and thereby makes us poorer? View all 5 comments.

Every Gentlemen here is born a petty Tyrant. The black population of the United States in was in the main destitute and illiterate.

For the vast majority, no recordings, writings, images, or physical descriptions survive. Ruffin in By the beginning of the Civil War, railroads owned an estimated twenty thousand slaves. The desire of white farmers to recapture their former slaves through new civil laws was transparent. Supreme Court, Standard Oil, U.

Steel, Sloss-Sheffield Iron and Steel and other major corporations whose products you download played in slavery. It was simply amazing to learn of the many ways those in power used to keep blacks in slavery after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. In fact, author Blackmon writes that slavery didn't truly end until The Japanese had their internment camps.

The Jews had their Holocaust and yet, the American people have not learned from the past. The story was told in a non-threatening factual manner. Slavery by Another Name is a book that should be read by everyone and should be required reading and open for discussion at the high school and college levels. View all 6 comments. Mar 28, Karen Davis rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: First, let me acknowledge how difficult this book was for me to read. Not due to the writing but the topic and detail.

It was emotionally wrenching and Blackmon painstakingly filled each page with names and scenarios of the most cruelest brutalities…because he delved so deep into the research I found myself wanting to honor the men and women and children he had given name to by absorbing and reflecting as much as I could handle until I completed the book. Have you ever experienced an understandin First, let me acknowledge how difficult this book was for me to read. Have you ever experienced an understanding so vivid that you have difficulty even breathing?

The continuum of Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome widespread physical and psychic devastion and how it collectively effects the whole group was laid before me and how the discrepancies and injustices present in our justice system just kept running rampant in my mind. I know we sometimes do not want to acknowledge how oppression has operated in our past and present and we want to isolate occurrences as if they have no history, and even when we do, we speak in generalized speech.

He does so by researching legal, prison, and company documents and presenting details in a narrative form. After making the connections to how many individuals and corporations gained wealth at the expense of unjust prison labor system that randomly subjugated Black men, women and children to enslavement and continued risk of brutal death, Blackmon even reached out to present-day corporations to enlighten them on how their companies were built on the backs and lives of unjust prison slavery that lasted well into the 20th century.

The book begins with the search for the details of the life of one person, Green Cottenham, who was killed in a prison camp while still a young man in his 20s. The search leads the reader through the lives of others on both sides of this horrendous practice with the revelation of how widespread this practice was across the South and how later on it was sustained by industrialists of the North and how the Department of Justice handled or not the investigations of the practice.

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Apprenticeship Was Slavery By Another Name 1836

Mar 07, Katie rated it really liked it Shelves: I read this for a Race and Diversity class in college and while the subject matter was fascinating and horrifying, the writing was lacking. The author focuses on the statement that every child learns in elementary school: Slavery ended after the Civil War - and proves how false that statement is. It was enlightening and terrible at the same time. I had no idea how ignorant I was about that section of America's history.

African-Americans were basically re-enslaved for 75 years through the use of I read this for a Race and Diversity class in college and while the subject matter was fascinating and horrifying, the writing was lacking. African-Americans were basically re-enslaved for 75 years through the use of the legal system. In the South they would pick African-American men off the street for non-existent offenses such as "vagrancy" or "offensive acts" - which could mean almost anything - convict them, charge them exorbitant fees that they couldn't pay, and then sell them to lumber mills, coal mines, and the rail roads to work off their debt.

When those men got there, the conditions were inhuman, they were whipped and beaten daily, and for most of them no records were kept of their court appearance and conviction, so they had no way to leave. Most died within the first few months, and the few that survived were once again in a lifetime of servitude. This only ended in because the country needed African-American men to fight in World War II and to actually believe in the cause and their country.

slavery by another name ebook torrents

I took one star off for the writing, not the subject matter. I found the authors style to be repetitive and heavy-handed. He also tried to follow one family and man throughout the years of this new form of slavery and it didn't work at all. There was no personal attachment for me for this character he tried to create. I understand that he was trying to get his point across and make sure readers understood how awful this system was, but he didn't have to repeat everything multiple times.

I do recommend the book however because I don't think nearly enough people are aware of what was going on in the South between and View all 4 comments. I expected this book to rehash the well-known civil rights abuses that took place between the abolition of slavery and the Civil Rights Movements a hundred years later, but in fact it did so much more than that: The book meticulously documents how slavery continued "underground" after emancipation on a vast, all-encompassing scale through the various machinations of the US legal and corporate system, protec I expected this book to rehash the well-known civil rights abuses that took place between the abolition of slavery and the Civil Rights Movements a hundred years later, but in fact it did so much more than that: The book meticulously documents how slavery continued "underground" after emancipation on a vast, all-encompassing scale through the various machinations of the US legal and corporate system, protected at every level under the broad umbrella of "progress", how the North turned a blind eye, and on and on.

It's a terrible, intimate portrait of one family and the economic and political situation which encompassed them in a whirlwind of oppression, but at its heart it's a very important, overlooked part of American history whose legacy continues through the present day.

It was perhaps this post-bellum period which sowed the seeds of contemporary race politics and relations in the US more even than slavery itself. This is the post-emancipation history we never learned in school.

Highly recommended. I listened to the audiobook, perfectly narrated by Dennis Boutsikaris. Feb 09, Robert Federline rated it really liked it Recommended to Robert by: Janis C.

Brooks, Ph. This book is shocking until one remembers that the history studied in school, and in the popular books, is that which was written by the winners.

In the case where it was not a declared war, but rather an internal conflict, the ruling class's perspective controls. This is why there has been so little candidly written about the decimation of the Irish in the potato fame due to the hard-heartedness of the English. This book now reveals the shame in the United States in race relations following the This book is shocking until one remembers that the history studied in school, and in the popular books, is that which was written by the winners.

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This book now reveals the shame in the United States in race relations following the Civil War up to modern times. Even having lived through the turbulent 's and the Civil Rights Movement, it is hard to believe that racisim was so institutionalized as revealed by this book.

Racism is now viewed primarily as an issue of personal attitudes and prejudices. This book glaringly exposes how those attitudes were not only a majority viewpoint, but were adopted and promoted by the government and private industry, working hand-in-glove with one another.

Most adults today would tell you that slavery was ended by the Civil War, followed by the Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments.

Most educated people realize that the Emancipation Proclamation was more symbolic than practical in ending slavery, since it only applied to states which were in rebellion, and would have meant absolutely nothing had the North not won the war.

The 13th Amendment was thought to abolish slavery. It states, in part, "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude,. That loophole reads "except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted. Vagrancy legislation became de rigueur. The methods of conviction were so lax as to be non-existent.

Because the methods had the appearance of law, the re-enslavement of African Americans was accepted without comment or qualm. The fact that it existed so long -- that it encroached so deeply into the twentieth century and its institutions.

The system of slavery was changed, and persisted, because of systemic prejudice in the lives of the people. The horror of slavery existed in the first place only because of the arrogance of some people thinking that they were better than others for purely superficial reasons. Such a basis of prejudice continues, even today, in society. Unfortunately, it is not only within the ignorant masses, but even among those who are well-educated.

It is because of this insidious systemic prejudice that slavery was allowed to exist, and continued in altered forms. This book is a warning. Evil will persist as long as the good turn a blind eye, and are willing to accept superficial excuses for the subjugation and oppression of others. The methods used to suppress others have simply become more sophisticated.

While the dishonorable enslavement and selling of people to corporations, as revealed in this book, may no longer be taking place, we must be ever on guard against such evil as it diminishes all who are involved, whether voluntarily or involuntarily. Only by recognizing the inherent dignity of all men, and judging each man on his own merits, rather than by stereotypes and in group condemnations, can the human race progress. We must recognize that the human race is the only race, and we will lose the race, unless we support and run together.

In his epilogue, Blackmon asserts that "In every aspect and among almost every demographic, how American society digested and processed the long, dark chapter between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of the civil rights movement has been delusion. As the title makes plain, Blackmon describes the institutions that emerged to establish and maintain the forced labor of African Ame In his epilogue, Blackmon asserts that "In every aspect and among almost every demographic, how American society digested and processed the long, dark chapter between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of the civil rights movement has been delusion.

As the title makes plain, Blackmon describes the institutions that emerged to establish and maintain the forced labor of African Americans for a half century after nominal Emancipation.

Nobody who has paid even casual attention to matters of race in the American twentieth century should be entirely surprised to read that African-American life in the post-Reconstruction South was shaped by serfdom, peonage, and convict labor. But Blackmon's account does surprise the reader this one, at least with its meticulous mapping of the extent to which neo-slavery, and the legalized brutality undergirding such slavery, permeated the industrial as well as agricultural economies of the postbellum South.

Apr 12, Chris Van Dyke rated it it was amazing. Everyone should read this book -- the fact that almost no one knows about one of the most horrific chapters in our nation's recent history is shocking.

In fact, "shocking" describes most of this book; like "King Leopold's Ghost," its both depressingly real yet so horrific as to defy belief. In the epilogue, Blackmon says we need to rename the "Jim Crow Era" the "Era of Neoslavery" in order to reflect the reality of what was actually taking place. Did you know that, until the s, it was NOT a Everyone should read this book -- the fact that almost no one knows about one of the most horrific chapters in our nation's recent history is shocking.

Did you know that, until the s, it was NOT a federal crime to own slaves? That's just one of the countless facts that are so egregiously terrible that you would think everyone would know them, yet they have been hidden away into a collectively sustained amnesia. In stories that quickly become hauntingly and horrifically repetitive, Blackmon tells of the hundreds and thousands of African Americans who were enslaved after the Civil War -- and as late as World War II.

A few courageous individuals tried to speak out, but judges, sheriffs, and most of America looked the other way, especially since states and corporations were getting rich off the torturous, forced labor these slaves provided. As people who live in a prosperous nation whose wealth was build not just on antebellum slavery but slavery that lasted nearly half-way through the 20th century, we all have a responsibility to at least know that history.

Mar 02, David rated it it was amazing Shelves: Slavery didn't end at emancipation. I honestly didn't realize how pervasive it was. The number of companies and industries that built their wealth and influence on the backs of unpaid mostly black laborers is staggering. By treating blacks like criminals, some in law enforcement would arrest people for small infractions often loitering , charge them a fine they couldn't pay, have them sign a contract they couldn't read, and then offer to pay the fine in exchange for labor, all under the guise o Slavery didn't end at emancipation.

By treating blacks like criminals, some in law enforcement would arrest people for small infractions often loitering , charge them a fine they couldn't pay, have them sign a contract they couldn't read, and then offer to pay the fine in exchange for labor, all under the guise of keeping them out of jail.

They would then never allow the fine to be paid back.

Employers would download and sell these contracts among each other this way the weren't selling human beings, just contracts.

The history told in this book was painful to read, I found myself physically grieving at several points throughout. Slavery by Another Name offered me some much needed perspective. Mar 28, Sandra D rated it it was amazing Shelves: This book was a little too long, a bit slow in spots, occasionally repetitive, and there were even a couple of typos -- and I'm still giving it five stars.

It was that amazing. Nov 01, Charlene rated it it was amazing Shelves: Once slaves were "free," Southerners came up with creative and extremely effective ways to keep black men working for free. While this book is a must read on the subject, I would urge anyone interested to read David Oshinsky's Worse Than Slavery, an even better book about how freed black men were re ColinKaepernick HistoryOfJusticeInAmerica BLM This author provided an exceptional detailed description of how slavery continued long after the Civil War and the resulting emancipation proclamation.

While this book is a must read on the subject, I would urge anyone interested to read David Oshinsky's Worse Than Slavery, an even better book about how freed black men were re-enslaved.

Blackmon echoes much of what Oshinsky wrote ten years before the writing of this book. To get an even more complete understanding of the re-enslavement from the end of the Civil War until now, meaning the current re-enslavement of black men and women in America today, I would suggest reading Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which continues the story both Oshinsky and Blackmon told so well in their books.

In his book, Blackmon focused on how private prisons successfully stripped black men of the freedoms they had been given under the law after the Civil War.

Black men and women were no longer supposed to be forced to work in slave conditions for no wages, no way to own land, and no voice in politics. Since slavery was no longer legal, powerful men in the South went about making new laws that would once again make it legal to target black human beings and force them to work for free, stripping them of any power to make a decent life for themselves and their families.

One significant consequence of the new laws was that a prior slave owner could punish former slaves for being free. They don't want to work for free? Well the former slave owners would teach those 'uppity N's" a lesson. The vagrancy law made it illegal for men to not have a job.

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Black men continued to pick cotton, mine coal, and build railroads-- all without compensation. What is worse, if you can imagine anything being worse than slavery, is that unlike slave owners, who needed their "investment" healthy enough to keep working, prisons who leased out black men could make them work in the cotton fields or railroads when the sun was up and then make them work in the mines when the sun was down.

They worked so many slaves to a quick grave, the death toll in the prisons was astounding. They didn't need to protect the investment. They could just round up more black men on made up charges and force them to slave away every hour of their lives until they dropped dead. Then they would simply round up more. To make the laws looks fair, the Southern lawmakers put laws on the books that were supposed to pertain equally to white and black people.

However, in reality, just like we see today, black people were targeted for the same actions committed by white people. Black people were arrested for those actions while white people generally were not. This had the effect of rounding up a significant portion of the black population to ensure slavery would live on. There is much talk today of ramping up the numbers of private prisons. I mean, it sounds like it makes a lot of sense to make criminals pay for themselves.

Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Blackmon unearths the lost stories of slaves and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servi. Read more Show all links.

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Similar Items Related Subjects: African Americans -- Employment -- History. African Americans -- Crimes against -- History. Slavery -- United States -- History. United States -- Race relations -- History. African Americans -- Civil rights.

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Primary Entity http: CreativeWork , schema: Book , schema: This malformed URI has been treated as a string - 'http: The Wedding; II.African Americans -- Employment. The author easily demonstrates when the perpetrators of re-enslavement, despite their pleas of ignorance of the law, display through their own actions that they fully knew what they were doing was wrong.

A Note on Language.

It was all just "Nothin' to see here Intangible ;. What was once an adversarial system, where lawyers fought against each other, is now a system in which lawyers work together to enter pleas. Blacks would be arrested on a trumped up charge and then fined to pay court cost.